Last week, New York legislators endorsed Governor Andrew Cuomo’s ambitious clean energy goals, adopting the Climate Leadership Community Protection Act that targets an aggressive expansion of on- and offshore wind development and the integration of solar and battery storage resources onto the electric grid.  When implemented, the new legislation will require the complete decarbonization of

The New York State Department of Environmental Conservation[1] (“NY DEC”), the state regulatory body charged with conserving, improving, and protecting New York’s natural resources and environment[2], has proposed a new rule aimed at curtailing New York’s nitrogen oxide (“NOx”) output.[3]

The United States Environmental Protection Agency, under the Clean Air Act, sets National Ambient Air Quality Standards (“NAAQS”) for harmful pollutants, including ozone.[4]   As of October 1, 2015, the eight-hour NAAQS for ozone is 0.070 ppm.[5]  Ozone comes in “good” and “bad” varieties.  “Bad” ozone is formed from a chemical reaction in which NOx is a main ingredient.[6]
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Recently New Jersey and California took monumental steps to remain nationwide leaders in clean energy. New Jersey increased its Renewable Energy Standard to make it one of the most aggressive standards in the nation while at the same time supporting its nuclear industry and seeking to diversify its energy sources.  California implemented a first of

No longer reserved for tech giants such as Google, Amazon, and Facebook, financial instruments such as synthetic power purchase agreements (PPAs) are becoming popular among smaller to mid-sized corporations as a tool to reduce energy cost volatility while meeting clean energy goals.  In what began as a movement to limit corporate carbon footprints and which