Hydropower partner Chuck Sensiba is published in the April 2018 edition of The Environmental Law Reporter for a byline he coauthored titled, “Deep Decarbonization and Hydropower.” The article is excerpted from a soon-to-be-published book, Legal Pathways to Deep Decarbonization in the United States, by Michael B. Gerrard & John C. Dernbach.

In his article, Sensiba writes about hydropower’s role in reducing the United States’ dependence on carbon and examines challenges that can be addressed through specific legal and policy reforms. He writes, “Realizing the full potential of hydropower and maintaining the current hydropower fleet will likely depend on overcoming a number of impediments, including lengthy and complex regulatory requirements, failure of electricity markets to adequately compensate hydropower generators for the grid benefits they provide, environmental opposition to new hydropower, and interest in dam removal.” Read the full article here.

While hydroelectric generation has historically been the largest source of renewable electricity generation, the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) expects wind power to surpass hydro and become the largest renewable generation source sometime in the next two years. 2017 was a relatively wet year with hydro providing 7.4% of total utility-scale generation. But with only a handful of new hydro plant slated to come online in the next two years, hydroelectric generation will depend largely on water runoff and precipitation. Currently, the EIA predicts that hydro will be slightly lower in 2018 and 2019, and will produce 6.5% and 6.6% of utility-scale generation respectively. Although weather also greatly affects wind generation, output forecasts from wind are more dependent on capacity and the timing of new facilities coming online.

Continue Reading Wind to Surpass Hydro as Largest Renewable Electricity Generation Source