Infocast’s Mid-Atlantic Renewable Energy Summit, July 17-19, 2019, will bring policy-makers & regulators together with utilities, IPPs, developers of wind, solar & storage projects, investors, financiers and other industry stakeholders to examine the biggest PJM market challenges, navigate the complicated landscape, and take advantage of the vast opportunities for renewable energy in the market.

Troutman

Last week, New York legislators endorsed Governor Andrew Cuomo’s ambitious clean energy goals, adopting the Climate Leadership Community Protection Act that targets an aggressive expansion of on- and offshore wind development and the integration of solar and battery storage resources onto the electric grid.  When implemented, the new legislation will require the complete decarbonization of

The New York State Department of Environmental Conservation[1] (“NY DEC”), the state regulatory body charged with conserving, improving, and protecting New York’s natural resources and environment[2], has proposed a new rule aimed at curtailing New York’s nitrogen oxide (“NOx”) output.[3]

The United States Environmental Protection Agency, under the Clean Air Act, sets National Ambient Air Quality Standards (“NAAQS”) for harmful pollutants, including ozone.[4]   As of October 1, 2015, the eight-hour NAAQS for ozone is 0.070 ppm.[5]  Ozone comes in “good” and “bad” varieties.  “Bad” ozone is formed from a chemical reaction in which NOx is a main ingredient.[6]
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On September 27, 2018, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit (“Second Circuit”) dismissed challenges to the New York zero emission credit (“ZEC”) program, ruling that: (1) the ZEC program is not field preempted by the Federal Power Act (“FPA”) because the ZEC program is not expressly tied to wholesale market participation or

On August 24, 2018, the Rhode Island Public Utilities Commission (“PUC”) adopted an amended settlement in the Narragansett Electric Company (“National Grid”) rate case. The approved plan provides for an annual step increase over three years resulting in a cumulative $28.9 million rate increase for electric operations and a cumulative $17.4 million rate increase for

Recently New Jersey and California took monumental steps to remain nationwide leaders in clean energy. New Jersey increased its Renewable Energy Standard to make it one of the most aggressive standards in the nation while at the same time supporting its nuclear industry and seeking to diversify its energy sources.  California implemented a first of

Originally posted on Troutman Sanders’ Washington Energy Report 

On April 2, 2018, FERC denied a complaint alleging that the interconnection process under Midcontinent Independent System Operator, Inc.’s (“MISO”) tariff was unjust and unreasonable because certain wind generators were experiencing delays in the process, such that those customers would not receive a Generator Interconnection Agreement (“GIA”) in time to receive Federal Production Tax Credit (“PTC”) benefits.  In doing so, FERC found that there was no evidence that MISO was not making reasonable efforts to meet interconnection deadlines, as required by its tariff.  FERC added that prior precedent does not require MISO to ensure wind generators receive their GIA in time to receive full PTC benefits.
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Originally posted on Troutman Sanders’ Washington Energy Report

On March 9, 2018, a divided FERC approved the Competitive Auctions with Sponsored Policy Resources (“CASPR”) proposal submitted by the ISO New England Inc. (“ISO-NE”). Developed through an extensive stakeholder process that began in 2016, CASPR was promoted by ISO-NE as a mechanism to integrate out-of-market state resource policies that might otherwise suppress capacity market prices in ISO-NE’s capacity market. A divided FERC approved the proposal as a just and reasonable accommodation of state policies, with Commissioner Powelson dissenting, arguing that the proposal dilutes market signals and “threatens the viability” of ISO-NE’s capacity market. Commissioners LaFleur and Glick concurred with the outcome, but criticized the order’s guidance on adapting markets to state energy policies, and reliance on minimum offer pricing rules (“MOPRs”) as the “standard solution” to achieve that end.
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